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Woolwich

New images revealed for Woolwich estate redevelopment

Existing McDonalds on left

Plans have been revealed showing new homes coming to the Morris Walk estate in Woolwich which is currently being demolished.

I looked into changes a couple of weeks ago, and these images add a bit of flesh to the bones. The total number of homes at Morris Walk, or Trinity Walk as it’s rebranded, will rise from 552 to 766. The land was owned by Greenwich Council who have entered a joint venture with Lovell Homes.

Built using Danish system – hence names on estate relate to Denmark

There is a sizeable drop in social homes not just here but across three Woolwich estate in a project known as “One Woolwich”. Around ,1000 social homes reduces in number to 35 per cent of 1,500 (so around 500), of which some are shared ownership. So far it’s taken nearly 15 years to get to this point.

We can assume these consultation plans are pretty final as the EIA submitted a couple of weeks ago stated a final submission was imminent.

Overall site

The highest density of housing is to the north of the railway tracks. Heights then taper down to the south.

Morris Walk south

From above it looks as though this is a transport-orientated development around a station. It isn’t though, despite a rail line running through it.

Station in centre? Nope

It would make quite a bit of sense to move the existing Woolwich Dockyard station to this area at the centrepiece of the new estate, as well as in a location closer to 8,000 homes coming to the Charlton masterplan area including  500-home Faraday Works development submitted this year.

North of Morris Walk

Other nearby towers have been approved:

Approved – and separate to Morris Walk

It’d also solve the 12 carriage train issue at the existing station.

Blocks reach 13 floors

Despite the railway passing directly through the estate and many bus routes nearby, the number of parking spaces is relatively high for an inner London new build. 144 spaces are proposed at Morris Walk north. Another 288 parking space are provided at Morris Walk south.

Existing station built in a cutting which limits platform length

A dedicated cycle lane alongside the site is now on hold, with a cheap replacement being a bus lane recently painted onto the road. Traffic is now extremely slow going, and if it is to stay, more vehicles will not help.

Major street project on hold – and with TfL finances unknown if will proceed

There is no Parking Zone currently in the area and developers state there will be sufficient capacity for extra cars in the area.

Consultation

The consultation is the most convoluted I’ve ever seen, and I managed – after some time – to look through the documents.

Instead of a simple website or PDF for the public to view details – as seen in just about every other consultation – someone decided you first have to first download a PDF, open that up and then view a number of QR codes for each area of the consultation. So I had to download a PDF onto my PC, then use my phone to point at my monitor to bring up the QR code link on my phone and watch a video hosted on Vimeo. Six separate times. If they sought to lock out most people, this is a good way.

Viewing the QR codes on your phone? I’m not sure how you then view the consultation on the same phone.

Click here to download the PDF, and then go through the rigmarole of viewing each QR code.

 

6 Comments

  1. CDT

    I think moving Woolwich Dockyard Station nearer to the Morris Walk development makes perfect sense Murky.

    Also as you say will help the 12 carriage trains to be introduced on the Woolwich Line which will be very much needed with all the new homes being built in the area,

    Infrastructure is very important for all new developments

    • Moving the station would be terrible value for money, surely. Dockyard is a minor station to start with, and the 12 car issue is already solved by 12 car trains simply not calling there. Wishful thinking.

  2. Roy

    Thank you for the full explanation…another example of non joined up thinking re housing ..transport amenities and Parking….from my viewpoint a complete lack of user friendly housing more fit for chickens than people…

  3. CDT

    Not really Propertics as Roy said “another example of non joined up thinking re housing transport and amenities and parking”

    Remember other developments are also taking place in the area. Resulting in a lot of high density housing with not a lot of public space.

  4. Graham

    I also agree with with Roy’s posting,

    “another example of non joined up thinking re housing ..transport amenities and Parking….from my viewpoint a complete lack of user friendly housing ”

    I do not think we have anywhere near the transport infrastructure and amenities including schools and health centres for the amount of new homes that have already been built in the Borough. With many new homes currently under construction and the thousands of new homes planned in the near future including new developments in Woolwich and Charlton close to the Morris Walk Estate.

  5. How are local people going to be able to rent a home here or buy? There is no commitment to the London Affordable Rent so ‘affordable’ rents’at 80% of the commercial rate will apply unless we tell the developers and council this is unacceptable. You have until 30th October to contact Lovells and the Council with your comments. Helen

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