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Woolwich

Greenwich Planning Board block Woolwich Tesco Tower

Land to rear of tesco

Greenwich’s Planning Board turned down a 27-floor tower outside Woolwich Tesco last night.

The move was expected after Greenwich planning officers recommended refusal.



However, as covered on this site, prior action by Greenwich Council ensure any appeal has a better chance of succeeding. A 2016 masterplan covering the site capped heights at 15 floors yet was scrapped by Greenwich Council after two rounds of consultation and over £124,000 spent. No reason ever given except a new one would be drawn up – which is too late for this site.

Also, outline planning permission was given for a tower a decade ago on the site.

The first phase won the carbunckle cup – especially for this facade

Both these actions possibly give developer Meyer Homes a good chance when (or if) they appeal. They will argue that a precedent has been set 10 years ago – and with no masterplan for the site and other tall buildings nearby – any inspector may let it pass.

Local group Speak Out Woolwich has campaigned against the tower and the low amount of social homes the entire development would provide – which also includes land to the rear. Around 1,600 people had signed a petition.

4 Comments

  1. tony g

    I’ve seen you reiterate this point about the failed Masterplan allowing for the inspectorate to overturn LB Greenwich’s decision. I don’t see why this is the case – there are numerous other planning issues associated with this tower which would result in the refusal being upheld.

    • Comment by post author

      fromthemurkydepths

      It’s one very important safe guard now gone for no apparent reason. The others may well be strong enough for the planning inspectorate – or not, particularly if Waterfront replacement plans on the Wilko site are tall.

  2. tony g

    I agree, its’ absurd that it was scrapped – will be interesting to see how their appeal goes down at the Lewisham Tesco site. Yes, hopefully they will be made to reduce heights there – but with Saidq, high density is the new modus operandi.

  3. anonymous201486

    If there isn’t a high enough quotient of affordable homes, the Mayor may well reject the appeal.

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