Greenwich tower plan beside the o2 is submitted

Plans are in to revise a previously approved tower design beside the o2 in Greenwich.

A 36-floor tower with a rooftop terrace and 820 student places in now proposed from developer Crosstree. This is the second student tower in Greenwich recently submitted. The other is a 27-floor tower near Deptford Creek submitted in May.

Submitted plan beside o2

Like much else on the peninsula, numerous plans have been and gone with no action at the site a stone’s throw from North Greenwich station. One of the earliest plans for the site in 2009 was a mid-rise block.

2009 proposal

That went nowhere. Then came a residential tower in 2015 with 268 flats.

Plan dropped

After that came a revised design in 2019.

That’s been tweaked further and we now have the 2023 submission.

Revisions now seen include “coloured metal spandrels panels and fins are introduced”. Textures of exterior panels is also coarser the further up the tower they rise.

Façade detail

This tower is extremely close to the Jubilee line station and joins many others in close proximity on the eastern stretch of the line with blocks rising near every Jubilee line station from Canada Water to Stratford.

Canada Water

Can’t miss this from much of south east London. It’s an area of a major development including knocking down the 1980s shopping centre.

This tower is already visible for some distance around.

Tower work now underway

Canary Wharf:

One stop east see plenty going on but the closest site to the Jubilee line station is Wood Wharf. Work on three tower is now in full swing.

Three towers now rising

Canning Town

Head further east and we reach Canning Town. Again there’s plenty of plans alongside new developments here, and the tallest of the lot is this block now about two-thirds up:

Approved in 2019. Now rising in Canning Town

West Ham

Next we head north to West Ham station where Twelvetrees park is now underway next door with one tower at a pretty advanced stage.

Here’s the planned overall look of the scheme with 3,500 homes.

Now underway in West Ham

Stratford

And then the final stop. Take your pic really again for new builds. The redevelopment of Jubilee house is probably the closest tower currently underway.

Site developed in two stages.

Each station at a succession of stations has a high density tower within metres of its entrance, which should ensure healthy ridership numbers in future even with the Elizabeth line.

Income

Greenwich have one of the lowest rates of Community Infrastructure Levy rates in London for student developments hampering future income to improve services.

After failing to revise rates in 2018 as promised they now look set to do so, but it again appears Greenwich residents and the wider area will miss out on potential funds.

Greenwich are looking to retain the same low rate of £65 per square metre set in 2015 – which after inflation in 2023 is now £89.09. That compares to a £200 CIL rate per square metre for student developments in Brent.

Poor streetscape in many areas

Over the river in Newham the rate was £130 when adopted and £180.59 in 2022. That doesn’t appear to dissuade student development. The block shown above is a student tower.

Tower Hamlets is £447.31 per square metre for student housing. Hackney was £373 in 2015. Bromley in 2021 set a level of £150. Lewisham is £109.65 per sqm and looking to revise.

Haringey set three levels which is something Greenwich could also do. It ranges from £265 in one zone, £165 in another and just £15 in other areas. In Greenwich borough prime areas around excellent transport links could see higher levels.

In Greenwich what we’ve have long seen and look set to still see a low rate in an area metres from the Jubilee line and minutes from central London.

Developers would pay less to support services here than in Brent and Newham

The borough and this development site have universities nearby and thus an enticing place for student development. Setting a higher rate similar to levels within other similar boroughs is unlikely to dissuade development given rates elsewhere in London.

This site is a short tube trip to Kings College campuses too, to give another example. And so setting such a low rate – and continuing with it – ensures that’s less money for health, education, transport and improving the dismal streetscape around the edges of the peninsula which dissuades healthy and active living.

Extremely poor streetscape on foot needs funding to improve. Low CIL rates hamper that

We’re now at the point the Woolwich station box will almost be paid off (years later than planned due to previous low rates) so let’s not make the same mistake again for years to come, ensuring minimal income for much needed services.

Tower plans can be viewed on the Greenwich Council planning portal here.

 

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J Smith

I've lived in south east London most of my life growing up in Greenwich borough and working in the area for many years. The site has contributors on occasion and we cover many different topics. Living and working in the area offers an insight into what is happening locally.

One thought on “Greenwich tower plan beside the o2 is submitted

  • That is an incredibly low levy rate given the near-riverside location (the views for most will be spectacular) and transport options. It’s 3 minutes to Canary Wharf and 9 to London Bridge. Such a prime site has the ability to levy a higher rate as currently the rate is more akin to an outer London zones 5-6 location that’s far further from educational institutions and central London than this.

    It’s frustrating. Potential lost levy income from one site alone would be enough to pay for plenty of cycle hangers, trees and so much else.

    Reply

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