Home Bargains Charlton branch to open in March

Home Bargains are to open their new Charlton store next month after previously giving a provisional estimate of “early 2021”.

The store takes over the former Wickes shop at Brocklebank retail park on Bugsby’s Way.

Brocklebank Retail Park. Former Wickes

Home Bargains have relatively few stores in London and could be a major driver of visitors to the area. The only other branch in south east London is out in Orpington.

The chain have grown quickly and is extremely popular in various parts of the country. The shop isn’t great for accessibility on foot via bus stops. Desire lines show how people travel – if physically able.

Quickest route from bus stop to store

If not it’s a traipse round via the car park entrance. This could have been sorted during construction of the retail park, but wasn’t.

 

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John Smith

I've lived in south east London most of my life growing up in Greenwich borough and working in the area for many years. The site has contributors on occasion and we cover many different topics. Living and working in the area offers an insight into what is happening locally.

4 thoughts on “Home Bargains Charlton branch to open in March

  • February 21, 2021 at 11:54 am
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    Totally with you Murky, public realm around this area is appalling, its as if they only want car drivers to access the shopping. A disgusting poorly maintained and never cleaned/swept area, made worse by fast food littering from McD’s which is always evident despite their claims to tidy.

    Reply
  • February 21, 2021 at 12:16 pm
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    it’s a popular store because it’s cheap produce Murky, sadly so. Since it inevitably relies on cheap imported produce, typically China sourced, rarely made in UK, and of man made materials rather than natural. Try and find a 100% cotton throw, or a 400 thread 100% cotton sheet and you’ll be lucky. It’s all poly-cotton and polyester. Whats wrong with that? it’s a ‘throwback’ to the past of cheap throwaway items regardless of consequences for the environment. Is this what the new professional young buying on the peninsula want? Mostly not I hope, they are more savvy buyers now, getting better quality from charity shops and quality stores for longer lasting (hence more economic too) and more interesting goods. A store like home bargains is never going to attract high spenders or investment in the area. This is not about snobbishness either, it’s about a future of caring for our environment, which we all need to practice not preach. Our children are taught it in schools, we watch David Attenborough, and then stores such as this gain in popularity for their provision of stuff causing the problems we deplore. Is it the stores fault?, marketing simply fulfilling a demand, should they have more corporate responsibility, or should we simply not buy from there and await a more modern and environmentally sensitive replacement? Jury’s not even out for me, the case is clear cut. Guilty those who encourage such produce by buying it, and in copious quantities.

    Reply
  • February 21, 2021 at 6:12 pm
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    Hahahaababbabababhahahab

    Quickest route from the bus stop, of course! Even with that silly sign!

    Reply
  • February 24, 2021 at 8:56 am
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    The plain fact is that almost everything we buy at any given price will have been made in China, Asia or the Indian sub-continent. Home manufacturing went decades’ ago when retailers started out-sourcing merchandise to increase profit. Further, the residents of all those shiny flats are paying through the nose and have very little disposable income, so a nice looking product that doesn’t cost much is perfect for them.

    We as consumers made a Faustian bargain with retailers when we exchanged quality and jobs for cheap products.

    Reply

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