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Ikea Greenwich’s community garden: how’s it looking?

A trip to Ikea six months after opening caused me to have a gander at areas previously overlooked when covering the store

One of those is the garden located to the rear of the store. Sainsbury’s previously occupied much of the site with an ecological garden to the rear of the store. Digging up the garden was a controversial, though not widely publicised cause of complaint.

Garden just after opening

Ikea promised a garden on part of the site. And, well, let’s just say it’s not well loved.

In plans it always felt a bit of a forced gesture to tie in with the “sustainable” claim to get permission to open. Fast forwards and the store now is, and most of the area is strewn with rubbish. Maybe I just arrived at an unfortunate time and Ikea are maintaining the space? It certainly didn’t look that way but possibly a bad day?

The pics don’t really get across the poor state of it. Rubbish was everywhere. If you’re in the area have a look and let me know what you think. In person it’s far from welcoming.

As an aside, while looking into more information on the garden it became apparent the sheer amount of PR waffle masquerading as articles on Ikea Greenwich. Unquestioning nonsense in many nationwide press outlets. It’s really quite something.

Sustainable transport

Another aspect I wanted to see was just how busy cycle racks beside the store were.

The covered stands were completely empty. All stands with shelters are positioned away from busy footfall spots nearest the store front, car park and bus stops.

Some stands closer to the store were however occupied but not a large amount for a busy day. Compared to some Ikea’s in other countries it’s a stark difference. And for the thousandth time, many visitors to Ikea are not buying large items. The UK has a huge way to go on sustainable, healthy ways of getting around.

New signals

On a brighter note both pedestrian crossings planned at an adjacent roundabout to the rear of the store are finally in operation.

New signals – not the best position though for north-south routes. Many will still cut around guardrails walking in the road

Two other arms of this roundabout still lack safe crossings with no plans to rectify that:

A welcome change is dropped kerbs on Horn Link Way meaning pedestrians in wheelchairs are nor forced on a lengthy diversion.

Further housing blocks at Greenwich Millenium Village are creeping towards Ikea.

Looking from Ikea garden towards new homes – heading north and crossing means taking a detour

More on that in a future post alongside other developments across the Peninsula.

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3 Comments

  1. GreenwichRes

    Shame about the garden. I don’t understand why they couldn’t keep the ecological one, it wasn’t that much bigger.

  2. CDT

    I was expecting more planting in the garden. I know we have had high winds over the last few days and rubbish does get blown around. But it seems to me people are just dropping rubbish were the think fit rather than putting rubbish in the nearest bin or taking the rubbish home to dispose of.

    Which to be fair is not really IKEA’s fault. However, being a flagship IKEA store I thought they may have had a member of the store cleaning staff out litter picking a few times a day.

    However, the areas public realm is still in need of major improvements.

  3. Mick Dee

    What kid of pigs are throwing this rubbish, they should be rounded up and thought about common decency. And if they had a shred of dignity about the presentation of their business why is IKEA not out there giving the place a quick spruce over? An hours work and that litter could be bagged and binned. A tenner on grass seed and a few left over plants from their store and this place could be lovely. As allured to, the garden is purely an appeasement to the council to secure planning permission.

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