FromTheMurkyDepths

Housing and Development in London

Charlton

Greenwich Council submit plans for 32 council houses in Charlton

In a somewhat unusual scheme in Greenwich borough these days, plans are in for 32 houses in Charlton. Most schemes above 10 properties are normally flats in the borough. These homes are planned at Sandpit Place in Charlton on the site of the former Sandpit Disability Resource Centre.

This is part of Greenwich Council’s round of council house building. I covered other sites here, including another in Charlton at Harvey Gardens.

Architects Peter Barber Associates state in planning documents:

“The proposal is for a residential development comprising of 32 new houses (30 two bed houses and 2 one bed houses). The houses are arranged as three back-to-back terraces running north to south across the site.

The scheme is designed to reinforce the existing street along Sandpit place and Erwood Road, creating a coherent urban edge around the site. The proposal also aims to increase permeability across the site, connecting Sandpit and Erwood to Little Heath (road) to the west.

The houses are arranged as back to back terraces, with pedestrian mews running between each back-to-back terrace of houses. Each unit’s primary aspect is into private a courtyard, avoiding any overlooking issues.

The dwellings are designed to a high standard with generous living space and external amenity spaces. This study outlines our ideas for the design of a beautiful pedestrian mews based quarter on the site, improving and reinstating a defi ned street edge along Sandpit Place, Hawkins Terrace and Erwood Road.” 

These schemes are much needed to alleviate the severe housing shortages and growing housing benefit bill from high private rental costs but are only able to be implemented on a small-scale as central government places very heavy restrictions on council building.

Government would rather let taxpayers fork out billions (£25 billion per annum) than work with public bodies and authorities to solve the housing crises and reduce costs. Ideology beats logic and saving taxpayers money.

To see more, click here and search for planning reference 17/0453/F

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3 Comments

  1. adam

    Small gardens, Some 1950s council houses in Greenwich (soe of which are now privately owned) have huge gardens.

  2. Elaine Whyte

    Why is govt placing heavy restrictions on Council building, do they prefer people to pay through the nose to private landlords then? Disgusting.

    • Yep. A third of MPs are landlords and many local politicians too. What’s best for individuals, families, communities and the taxpayer is not what’s best for them

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